build update

A collection of 25 post

Never Ending Insulation

Oh… my… gosh! This part never ends! For those of you thinking about tackling spray foam yourself, you may want to think it through a bit. While it is not a difficult task, it does consume a ton of time to do it properly… or even half-properly, like we’re doing. For starters, this stuff is messy…

Love the View

Stopped by the loft area of the shop last night for an updated pic of the tiny house. I must say, it’s looking great from here. The flashing is complete and came out great. If you look closely, you can even see the shaving of the excess foam insulation (more pics on that coming soon).

Garage & Utility Area

Not the most glamorous area of the tiny house, granted, however the utility area has been started. Although we’re not yet ready to add anything in there, we needed to reinforce the walls to be able to support this floating “garage”. Having this framed means we are able to finish the insulation and…

Sitting Area Lights

Lighting for the sitting area was added next. We need to complete the insulation and that means finishing the wiring on that end of the house. We went with 3” dimmable LEDs with a soft white color. The backing in the picture is temporary. This plywood will be removed soon and replaced with the…

Insulation Beginning

Within each cavity we used several of the fire-rated Dow Froth Pak 650 kits… or, at least, we’re starting to. The first section we tackled was the kitchen area. Each stud pay is slightly over-filled. Once we are finished applying the foam, we will be shaving it down to ensrue we have a full 3.…

Flashing

Using a combination of Zip Tape and Liquid Flash (lots of it), we sealed the entire structure and flashed the window openings. The beauty of the Zip sytem is we now have a proper air and water barrier. Although there is debate in both directions, we even plan on going over each of the nail…

Can Lights Installed

Running a 12” wide length of 1/2” ply down the center provides the perfect mounting area for the can lights as well as the natural transition from the ceiling pitch. The extra holes in the picture were cut in so we would have flexibility on the light placement while not having to worry about…

Bathroom Framed

Bathroom framing was necessary to be able to drop in the outlet and switch boxes for the electrical. Since space is limited, I decided to not build on top of the raised floor, as one would normally do. Instead, we went straight down the subfloor and braced the wall up about 14.75”. This created a…

Prep for Can Lights

Work for the can lights is underway! We started by breaking out the CNC again. We cut four 12x96” wide strips of plywood and used the CNC to slice out six super-percise mounting holes in each: Then, we cut sheets of 1” rigid insulation for each by and a series of side spacers. The insulation will…

Raised Floor - Part A

Ironically, we reached a point with the electrical where we needed the raised floor to be in place before continuing. The floor contains a “chaise”, towards the end of the trailer, which we need to tack the romex onto. So, before we continue with the electrical we will need to get the floor ready…

Electrical has begun!

Ever have one of those processes that sounded enjoable before you began? Well, electrical is one of them. This is gonna be easy. Right? After all, we are starting with a clean slate … Oh, and we have some cool toys to make things easier (these are great to work with, by the way) … However…

Sealing Wheel Wells

The first stage in becomming water-tight is complete! Spanning the wheel wells are two sets of large headers. These support the walls and prevent any of the weight from resting on the fenders. This created a need to encase the those areas. This meant building two boxes to surround these areas…

Another Florida Property

Well, we scored another property … barely. Talk about having to fight off the competition… geesh! This property is actually our second undeveloped lot in northern Florida (near the pan handle). This one is 5 acres and 99% cleared. We actually had people in town introduce themselves because they…

Build Update 20200721

Such a great surprise! The town’s Building Inspector stopped by, to do a final inspection on the workshop, and gave the tiny house a look over. While he did have a few pointers, he did not find anything that was out of code for RESIDENTIAL structures… which is above and beyond for anything related…

Build Update 20200719

Sheathing is 99% done.  The windows for the loft and family room have been framed and cut.  Both doors have been framed and cut.  We ended the weekend halfway through the bathroom window.  We still have not decided on the exact layout for the kitchen windows so they are still pending.  As soon as…

Build Update 20200705

At this point we have the roof sheathed, hurricane straps installed, and four of our windows framed. Progress seems to be slowing a bit in the warmer months. The weather in the shop at 14′ is completely different than being outside. Could be the AC from the office pumping hot air into the shop floor…

Blog Update 20200620

It’s really coming together! This weekend we finished the walls and started sheathing. There’s a completely different vibe standing on the trailer now. Once enclosed, you can really start to visualize the space. The green stuff you see is a special product called “Zip System.” Rather than simply…

Build Update 20200619

One of Fred’s friends, Dan Korb, pointed out the fasteners we were using to anchor the foundation to the trailer. Initially, we were using 5/8″ zinc-plated bolts with jam nuts. However, after finding a vendor who could supply them in a decent timeframe, they were all replaced with their Grade…

Build Update 20200614

Headers were fun (not). The headers above the doors were more “normal” than the sides, since the lumber can be cut and tossed around by one person. However, the sides were… wow. All headers were built by fusing a 1/2″ sheet of ply between two “two bys”… either 2×4, 2×6, or 2×12.

Build Update 20200607

Not sure, but I think this is weekend #2 of framing the walls. We were able to get up the majority of the left side as well as install the headers for the two entrances. The rear entrance is much taller than the front since the floor will be raised almost 15″ in the rear half. Next up are the mid…

Build Update 20200524

Bolted down the sole plates today. This foundation isn’t going anywhere… ever. Every 16″ is a 5/8″ x 7″ zinc-plated hex bolt. These bolts run through the soleplate, through the subfloor, the foundation, and through the 4″ angle iron lip on either side of the trailer. When it comes time to build the…

Build Update 20200521

Two 2x12x12 headers prepped and curing for the weekend.

Build Update 20200513

Framing started today with 115 kiln-dried Douglas Fir 2x4x12’s. Bought almost every decent board they had. The first section of the right all (the front) was torture. Also got to play with a shiny new Dewalt framing nailer. Love that thing!

Build Update 20200508

Foundation is done! First, we skinned the top of the trailer (belly of the foundation) with 20″ strips of aluminum flashing using construction adhesive. By overlapping each strip by 2″ we created an “escape route” for any water that may find its way into the house but yet sealed it enough so…

Build Update 20200502

The trailer is ready for the foundation! We added over 40 gussets along the sides of the trailer. They are probably overkill, but I’d like to be a bit anal with this build. Once they were ready, we drilled a series of 3/4″ holes down each side to anchor the foundation to the trailer. Small side note…

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